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Openness to Options

In News by Ira Feinstein

By Pamela Khim, GCFP Many, many times during the 27 years of my Feldenkrais® practice, I’ve seen how people shed years while gaining comfort—when they learn it’s in their best interest to not constantly contract their abdominal muscles. Shortly after starting my Feldenkrais practice in 1991, a retired eighty-year-old oncologist became my student because of his debilitating back pain and balance …

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Heart-Mind and Axon: Reflections on MS

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Ingrid Willenz-Isaac I touch my student’s foot as she is lying on the table, and suddenly her big toe pops up. Momentarily startled, I take my hands away and ask her if it hurts. It doesn’t. I already know that the toe twitching is called the Babinski sign, that it is an indication of demyelination of patches along the length …

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Power Learning: The Feldenkrais Method in the Classroom

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Beth Sidlow Mann, GCFP As a public school music teacher since 1986, I have always been interested in new ideas to help students learn. To stay on the cutting-edge of educational theory and techniques I attended educator conferences, staff development offerings, and summer courses. These courses, while helpful, were minimal in impact compared to the power of the Feldenkrais …

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Your Brain, Neuroplasticity, & the Feldenkrais Method

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Tyler Wall For anyone who has ever worked with a Feldenkrais practitioner, you may have discovered that the Feldenkrais Method® works, but you may not know how it works. For those who are curious, it works because the brain is plastic – meaning, it is malleable. According to brainline.org, the definition of neuroplasticity is “the brain’s amazing capacity to change and adapt. It refers to …

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Images of Aging The Feldenkrais® Way

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Buffy Owens, GCFP Article originally published in Prime Magazine. We have all been told that aging brings with it aches, pains and loss of function. Many of us have even accepted the fact that joint pain is inevitable and that we will someday have to give up doing those things that bring us the most joy. The joy of discovery …

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Openness to Options

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Pamela Kihm, GCFP Many, many times during the 27 years of my Feldenkrais® practice, I’ve seen how people shred years while gaining comfort—when they learn it’s in their best interest to not constantly contract their abdominal muscles. Shortly after starting my Feldenkrais practice in 1991, a retired eighty-year-old oncologist became my student because of his debilitating back pain and balance …

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Hypermobility: Less is More

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Rachel Hamstra, GCFP The term “hypermobility” covers a whole spectrum of excess joint mobility. It refers to everything from being able to bend your hand back towards your forearm to being a contortionist with the skill to control all that mobility. It also includes a client who I’ve been working with regularly for a few months. I’ll call her K. K …

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Locating Your Hip Joints and Why It Matters

In News by Ira Feinstein

By Angela Alston, GCFP The Feldenkrais Method® has no set lesson plans. We don’t have a school board. There’s no one dictating to me what themes to choose when teaching. So, after six years of teaching, I follow my hunches when planning what to teach. I listen to my private clients, to students in my classes. I continue with my …

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Tripping on Injury Prevention

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Paulette Dolin, GCFP One of my new students asked me how doing Feldenkrais® lessons would help in daily life. Among the benefits of doing Awareness Through Movement® lessons, injury prevention is high on my list. My first vivid experience of this was during my practitioner training. As I was going down some steps, I noticed rather calmly that I …

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Freeing the Jaw

In News by Ira Feinstein

by Buffy Owens, GCFP The upper jaw, part of the cranium, connects most intimately with the spine and back of the body. Every movement the upper jaw makes reverberates through the spine. But we will explore that a bit more in another lesson. The lower jaw (a.k.a. the mandible) connects most intimately with your body-core, rib basket, and sternum. Imagine …